Trump on Kap: Maybe he should find another country

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has weighed in on San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s decision to refuse to stand for the playing of the national anthem in protest of what he deems as racial injustice in the United States in addition to recent comments from the quarterback on Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

It’s unclear if the Saints expect McCain to push third-year pro Kasim Edebali for a starting job or if they were just looking for depth and special-teams help. But the Saints have essentially been in the market for pass-rush help since back in March — a need that became even greater after second-year defensive end Hau’oli Kikaha went down with a knee injury this summer.

New Orleans apparently decided to look outside the building for help after being disappointed with its most recent preseason results. Coach Sean Payton called the pass rush “very concerning” after Friday’s preseason loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Coming of age in America’s turbulent 1960s, though, Brown is also recognized for a social activism beyond football that led to the Black Economic Union and the Amer-I-Can program which has changed the lives of former gang members and ex-convicts.

Appearing on Monday’s edition of NFL Total Access, Brown weighed in on the controversy surrounding San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s recent protest during the playing of the national anthem.

“I listened to him and he makes all the sense in the world. He’s within his rights and he’s telling the truth as he sees it,” Brown explained. “I am with him 100 percent. … Now if you ask me ‘Would I do that?’ No I won’t, because I see it a little differently. I’m an American citizen, I pay my taxes, I want my equal rights but this is my country, and consequently I don’t want to open up for ISIS or anybody that will take away what we’ve already gained.”

When Brown arrived on the NFL scene in 1957, he fought for equal rights in a league that still limited the number and influence of African-American players.

“We had to fight in a certain kind of way to make it better,” Brown said, “so these young people can make the kind of money they’re making and the league can be 80 percent African American.

“Young men in my day really stepped up. … These were champions for freedom, equality and justice for all humans beings, and they were educated individuals that used their education and knowledge to represent their case. So now 50 years later we have a young man saying something that was kind of taken for granted in our day. We were way past that. For me it’s like going back in time.”

While professional athletes have been reluctant to speak out in recent years, Brown believes there are signs that they are becoming more outspoken and willing to deal with the public backlash — as Seahawks defensive lineman Michael Bennett implored late last month.

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